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Asian Pacific Students in Minnesota: Facts, not Fiction

Asian Pacific students in Minnesota

Read the entire report at http://www.capm.state.mn.us/pdf/edureport2012.pdf

This report on the educational achievement of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota, conducted by the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans, broadens the data on Asian Pacific students in Minnesota.

The Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans is a state agency that advises the Minnesota state legislature and governor’s office and advocates for the well-being of Asian Pacific Minnesotans.

According to the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment (MCA) 2011 test results, 66.1% and 54.4% of Asian Pacific students scored as proficient on the MCA reading and math tests, respectively. In comparison, 80.8% and 63.3% of White students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.

This seemingly smaller achievement gap between Asian Pacific and White students has led to less attention and concern given to the needs of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota. However, researchers, community members, and educational professionals have long recognized that the reporting of aggregated data for Asian Pacific students is misleading and masks educational disparities experienced within the Asian Pacific population in Minnesota.

In response, this report disaggregates MCA data for Asian Pacific students by language spoken at home, ethnicity, income level, English proficiency, and mobility. Through such analysis, this report provides new understandings about the academic performance of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota.

Key findings of the report are:

Significant achievement gaps exist for refugee experienced Asian Pacific students.

  • 50.3% and 40% of refugee experienced Asian Pacific students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.
  • Less than 17% of Burmese students were proficient in reading or math, the lowest of any ethnic or racial student group.
  • Less than 59% and 40% of Lao, Hmong, and Cambodian students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.
  • In comparison, 80.8% and 63.3% of White students scored as proficient in reading and math, respectively.

Students’ income level, English proficiency, and mobility status were significant factors in predicting their academic achievement.

  • Low-income Asian Pacific students experienced achievement gaps of up to 31% on the MCAs in comparison to their more affluent Asian Pacific peers.
  • Asian Pacific students receiving English Learner services experienced achievement gaps of up to 44% on the MCAs in comparison to English proficient Asian Pacific students.
  • Homeless or highly mobile Asian Pacific students experienced achievement gaps of up to 23% on the MCAs in comparison to non-mobile Asian Pacific students.

The findings from the disaggregated data directly counter the widely held misconception that all Asian Pacific students were performing at levels well above other minority students and only slightly below White students, and thus, were not as deserving of additional support. In reality, refugee experienced, low-income, English learning, and highly mobile Asian Pacific students experience significant educational disparities, and in some cases, had lower proficiency rates than other racial groups.

Recommendations for policy makers

The Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans highly recommends a renewed focus on improving the educational outcomes of all students by including Asian Pacific students in the vision of educational equity. Specifically, we recommend the following actions:

1. Standardize the practice of collecting and reporting disaggregated student data.

Without disaggregated data, the educational disparities of Asian Pacific students will continue to be covered up by misleading information, making it difficult to allocate attention, resources, and support for students who need it most.

2. Streamline efforts that monitor and address the additional challenges faced by refugee experienced students as well as by students who are low-income, English Learners, and/or highly mobile.

Refugee experienced and socioeconomically disadvantaged Asian Pacific students experience significant educational barriers. Efforts to overcome these barriers should be evaluated and successful models of educational leadership, pedagogy, and programming should be shared across the state.

3. Increase the cultural competency and awareness among educational professionals of Asian Pacific students. Understanding the strengths, interests, and needs of students is crucial in moving away from a deficit view of diverse student populations and in implementing strategies to increase the academic growth of students.

4. Policy makers and education leaders should solicit the input and involvement of refugee experienced and socioeconomically disadvantaged Asian Pacific communities in the vision of educational equity.

Community members should be regarded as powerful partners in education who have expertise in determining the viability and effectiveness of potential educational programming, strategies, and interventions for their students.

Read the entire report at http://www.capm.state.mn.us/pdf/edureport2012.pdf

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Posted by on April 16, 2012 in CAPM news, Resources

 

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March 12, 2012 – Burma Health Dialogue recap

Burma

On March 12, 2011, the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans joined with five other sponsors to host the Burma Health Forum, which aimed to create greater dialogue pertaining to the health needs of refugees from Burma in Minnesota. The forum featured keynote speaker, Dr. Myo Nyunt, who provided political and historical background information on the country of Burma; a first-hand refugee story from Eh Tha Khu, a newly arrived Karen refugee to Minnesota; and several panelists who work in both systems navigation and health integration for refugee community members in the state of Minnesota.

SponsorsThe Language BancThe Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans,Karen Organization of MinnesotaHealthEast Care SystemUCareMN Department of Health

Event Materials

Presentations (all files are in PDF format, will open in new window)

It is the hope of this council and its sponsors that this forum will be the first of many discussions about how to better address the various healthcare needs of refugees from Burma living in Minnesota. It is imperative that healthcare providers work with both local refugee integration organizations as well as the Burma community itself to gain a greater understanding of the unique cultural, linguistic, and personal barriers that prevent these citizens from getting the care they need and deserve.

Call to ActionWithout action, there is no change.

  • Contact your legislators: Individuals, groups, or organizations interested in speaking to legislators to advocate on behalf of the community from Burma may contact the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans.
  • Connecting with stakeholders: Want to be more involved in discussing way to improve health outcomes and health care access for refugees from Burma? Please contact the Council at capm@state.mn.us as a way to get in touch with organizations and individuals working on this topic.
 
 

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Interpreters needed

The Center for Victims of Torture is seeking Tigrenya, Karen, Cambodian/Khmer, and Mandingo interpreters to provide interpretation services to international clients who are receiving therapy, social, and medical services. Interpretation is typically in a face-to-face setting, but there may be periodic need for phone interpretation or document translation.  Interpretation services are provided on a part-time, as-needed basis in St. Paul. Hours vary, but typically interpreters will work between 2 to 6 hours per week. Hourly rate is $20-$25 per hour.

  • Applicant must possess excellent interpreting skills.
  • Fluency in target language and English.
  • Must be registered on the MN Department of Health Interpreter Registry
  • Interpreting experience in the medical, mental health, or social services areas preferred.
  • Experience working in a confidential environment.
  • Interested in the advancement of human rights.
  • Must be able to work flexible hours between the hours of 9 am – 5 pm, Monday – Friday.

For more information and to apply:  http://cvt.simplicant.com/

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2012 in Community news

 

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Working with Refugees in Minnesota

Working with Refugee Families in the Child Welfare System

children with a world globe

Authors
Patricia Shannon, PhD, LP
Jennifer Simmelink, MSW

This module provides information about the major refugee groups in Minnesota, the Karen, Bhutanese, Oromo, Somali, and Iraqi. It provides political and cultural context for these groups as well as information about factors that impact them in the child welfare system. It also includes recommendations for child welfare workers who work with these populations.

NOTE: CEU credit is not available for this module because it can be completed in less than 30 minutes.

Follow the link below to watch the presentation.

Watch the module on  Working with Refugee Families in the Child Welfare System

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Health Literacy: Implications for Immigrant and Refugee Families

 mother and children

Authors:
Hee Yun Lee, PhD

This modules explores the relationship between health literacy, health outcomes, and health disparities with special attention to children and families and immigrants and refugees.  It provides specific examples of how health literacy can affect health outcomes and offers interventions to respond to health literacy needs and to reduce health disparities.

Follow this link to watch the module.

 

Taking the Quiz and Earning Continuing Education Hours (CEHs)

At the end of this module, you will be given a choice to connect to the quiz for the module.  Upon successful completion of the quiz (80% or above correct), there will be a link to a secure site to pay a minimal fee for the CEHs and receive a CEH completion certificate.  The module has a value of 1 CEH ($15.00).

Back to Online Learning Modules page

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2012 in Resources

 

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Burma Health Dialogue: From Entry to Integration

Burma Health Dialogue: From Entry to Integration

Monday, March 12, 2012

Time: 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Location: MN Department of Health’s Snelling Office Park

Mississippi Room, 1645 Energy Park Drive, St Paul, MN

Link for directions: http://www.health.state.mn.us/about/sop.html

Burma

This dialogue is a follow up to the event ‘Healthcare for the Burmese and Karen Communities in Minnesota: A Community Conversation’ held on October 29, 2011 at Rondo St. Paul Public Library.

 

Suggested attendees include: health providers, social workers, educators, health plans, legislators, social service providers, community agencies and others serving refugees from Burma.

 

Highlights Include:

Overview:   Refugees from Burma

Panel 1: Entry – Journey to the United States 

This panel will include a personal refugee story, as well as provide insight into the role that several agencies play when new refugees come to Minnesota. Panelists will include representatives from the state health department, a local refugee resettlement agency and a community based organization.

Panel 2: Integration – Health Care Coordination

This panel will explore the systems needed to ensure care coordination for refugees after initial resettlement in the U.S. as well as an overview by a primary care provider on working with refugees from Burma. Panelists will include representatives from an interpreter service agency, a health plan, a health provider, and a healthcare navigator. 

Interactive discussion will be encouraged throughout the afternoon.

Stay tuned for a detailed agenda coming soon!

CEUs will be available. This event is FREE to the public.

RSVP to Scott Ruhsam at sruhsam@thelanguagebanc.com or 612-588-9410 by March 5.

This program is sponsored by MDH, HealthEast Care System, UCare, Karen Organization of Minnesota, Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans and Language Banc.

healthdialogue sponsors

 
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Posted by on February 22, 2012 in CAPM Events, CAPM news

 

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Karens in Minnesota

The Asian American Press discussed with two Karen community leaders about hardships and successes of the Karen community in Minnesota.

There are about 6,000 Karens living in Minnesota. The largest populations are in St. Paul and Roseville while there are also significant numbers living in Worthington, Austin, Eveleth, Faribault, and Marshall.

On speaking about how far Karens have come in their adopted state, “Karens are doing well and appreciate the support they receive from the public and non-profit agencies in Minnesota.”

To know more, please click here to read the full article from the Asian American Press.

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2012 in Community news

 

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