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2013 Reading Together Book Launch

Join community members, the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans, and the Minnesota Humanities Center as we celebrate the four upcoming titles from the 2013 Reading Together Project. Guests will have the opportunity to meet the authors and illustrators, hear more about their inspirations and work, ask questions, and receive a complimentary copy of all four titles.

The 2013 titles are:

Linh and the Red Envelope
Written by: Diane Tran
Illustrated by: Alex Shimkus

Melody of the Qeej
Written by: Mai Kou Xiong
Illustrated by: Vang P. Lee

Night Breeze
Written by: Steve Wright
Illustrated by: Ilhwa Gloria Kim

Tawan the Sun Girl
Written by: Chay Douangphouxay
Illustrated by: Alex Kuno

The evening begins with an hors de’eouvres reception at 5:30 p.m. Panel discussion begins at 6:00 p.m. with a book signing to follow. These books are written at an early elementary level (grades 2-3), and children are encouraged to attend.

Date: Wednesday, October 30, 2013, 5:30 p.m.
Location: Minnesota Humanities Center
987 Ivy Ave. E, St. Paul, MN 55106 (map)

If you plan to attend, please RSVP here.

About the Reading Together Project:

This is the second year of the Reading Together Project collaboration between the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans and the Minnesota Humanities Center. The Reading Together Project seeks to address the lack of children’s books that speak to the experience of being an Asian Pacific Islander (API) child or youth in the United States. The project supports the development of English literacy skills while recognizing cultural heritage and creating opportunities for children and families to learn about API cultural heritage together. The project will disseminate resources targeted towards closing the achievement gap for API students by offering culturally relevant resources.

*This work is funded in part with money from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund that was created with the vote of the people of Minnesota on November 4, 2008.

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Asian Pacific Students in Minnesota: Facts, not Fiction

Asian Pacific students in Minnesota

Read the entire report at http://www.capm.state.mn.us/pdf/edureport2012.pdf

This report on the educational achievement of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota, conducted by the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans, broadens the data on Asian Pacific students in Minnesota.

The Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans is a state agency that advises the Minnesota state legislature and governor’s office and advocates for the well-being of Asian Pacific Minnesotans.

According to the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment (MCA) 2011 test results, 66.1% and 54.4% of Asian Pacific students scored as proficient on the MCA reading and math tests, respectively. In comparison, 80.8% and 63.3% of White students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.

This seemingly smaller achievement gap between Asian Pacific and White students has led to less attention and concern given to the needs of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota. However, researchers, community members, and educational professionals have long recognized that the reporting of aggregated data for Asian Pacific students is misleading and masks educational disparities experienced within the Asian Pacific population in Minnesota.

In response, this report disaggregates MCA data for Asian Pacific students by language spoken at home, ethnicity, income level, English proficiency, and mobility. Through such analysis, this report provides new understandings about the academic performance of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota.

Key findings of the report are:

Significant achievement gaps exist for refugee experienced Asian Pacific students.

  • 50.3% and 40% of refugee experienced Asian Pacific students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.
  • Less than 17% of Burmese students were proficient in reading or math, the lowest of any ethnic or racial student group.
  • Less than 59% and 40% of Lao, Hmong, and Cambodian students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.
  • In comparison, 80.8% and 63.3% of White students scored as proficient in reading and math, respectively.

Students’ income level, English proficiency, and mobility status were significant factors in predicting their academic achievement.

  • Low-income Asian Pacific students experienced achievement gaps of up to 31% on the MCAs in comparison to their more affluent Asian Pacific peers.
  • Asian Pacific students receiving English Learner services experienced achievement gaps of up to 44% on the MCAs in comparison to English proficient Asian Pacific students.
  • Homeless or highly mobile Asian Pacific students experienced achievement gaps of up to 23% on the MCAs in comparison to non-mobile Asian Pacific students.

The findings from the disaggregated data directly counter the widely held misconception that all Asian Pacific students were performing at levels well above other minority students and only slightly below White students, and thus, were not as deserving of additional support. In reality, refugee experienced, low-income, English learning, and highly mobile Asian Pacific students experience significant educational disparities, and in some cases, had lower proficiency rates than other racial groups.

Recommendations for policy makers

The Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans highly recommends a renewed focus on improving the educational outcomes of all students by including Asian Pacific students in the vision of educational equity. Specifically, we recommend the following actions:

1. Standardize the practice of collecting and reporting disaggregated student data.

Without disaggregated data, the educational disparities of Asian Pacific students will continue to be covered up by misleading information, making it difficult to allocate attention, resources, and support for students who need it most.

2. Streamline efforts that monitor and address the additional challenges faced by refugee experienced students as well as by students who are low-income, English Learners, and/or highly mobile.

Refugee experienced and socioeconomically disadvantaged Asian Pacific students experience significant educational barriers. Efforts to overcome these barriers should be evaluated and successful models of educational leadership, pedagogy, and programming should be shared across the state.

3. Increase the cultural competency and awareness among educational professionals of Asian Pacific students. Understanding the strengths, interests, and needs of students is crucial in moving away from a deficit view of diverse student populations and in implementing strategies to increase the academic growth of students.

4. Policy makers and education leaders should solicit the input and involvement of refugee experienced and socioeconomically disadvantaged Asian Pacific communities in the vision of educational equity.

Community members should be regarded as powerful partners in education who have expertise in determining the viability and effectiveness of potential educational programming, strategies, and interventions for their students.

Read the entire report at http://www.capm.state.mn.us/pdf/edureport2012.pdf

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Posted by on April 16, 2012 in CAPM news, Resources

 

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