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Asian Pacific Students in Minnesota: Facts, not Fiction

Asian Pacific students in Minnesota

Read the entire report at http://www.capm.state.mn.us/pdf/edureport2012.pdf

This report on the educational achievement of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota, conducted by the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans, broadens the data on Asian Pacific students in Minnesota.

The Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans is a state agency that advises the Minnesota state legislature and governor’s office and advocates for the well-being of Asian Pacific Minnesotans.

According to the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment (MCA) 2011 test results, 66.1% and 54.4% of Asian Pacific students scored as proficient on the MCA reading and math tests, respectively. In comparison, 80.8% and 63.3% of White students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.

This seemingly smaller achievement gap between Asian Pacific and White students has led to less attention and concern given to the needs of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota. However, researchers, community members, and educational professionals have long recognized that the reporting of aggregated data for Asian Pacific students is misleading and masks educational disparities experienced within the Asian Pacific population in Minnesota.

In response, this report disaggregates MCA data for Asian Pacific students by language spoken at home, ethnicity, income level, English proficiency, and mobility. Through such analysis, this report provides new understandings about the academic performance of Asian Pacific students in Minnesota.

Key findings of the report are:

Significant achievement gaps exist for refugee experienced Asian Pacific students.

  • 50.3% and 40% of refugee experienced Asian Pacific students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.
  • Less than 17% of Burmese students were proficient in reading or math, the lowest of any ethnic or racial student group.
  • Less than 59% and 40% of Lao, Hmong, and Cambodian students were proficient in reading and math, respectively.
  • In comparison, 80.8% and 63.3% of White students scored as proficient in reading and math, respectively.

Students’ income level, English proficiency, and mobility status were significant factors in predicting their academic achievement.

  • Low-income Asian Pacific students experienced achievement gaps of up to 31% on the MCAs in comparison to their more affluent Asian Pacific peers.
  • Asian Pacific students receiving English Learner services experienced achievement gaps of up to 44% on the MCAs in comparison to English proficient Asian Pacific students.
  • Homeless or highly mobile Asian Pacific students experienced achievement gaps of up to 23% on the MCAs in comparison to non-mobile Asian Pacific students.

The findings from the disaggregated data directly counter the widely held misconception that all Asian Pacific students were performing at levels well above other minority students and only slightly below White students, and thus, were not as deserving of additional support. In reality, refugee experienced, low-income, English learning, and highly mobile Asian Pacific students experience significant educational disparities, and in some cases, had lower proficiency rates than other racial groups.

Recommendations for policy makers

The Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans highly recommends a renewed focus on improving the educational outcomes of all students by including Asian Pacific students in the vision of educational equity. Specifically, we recommend the following actions:

1. Standardize the practice of collecting and reporting disaggregated student data.

Without disaggregated data, the educational disparities of Asian Pacific students will continue to be covered up by misleading information, making it difficult to allocate attention, resources, and support for students who need it most.

2. Streamline efforts that monitor and address the additional challenges faced by refugee experienced students as well as by students who are low-income, English Learners, and/or highly mobile.

Refugee experienced and socioeconomically disadvantaged Asian Pacific students experience significant educational barriers. Efforts to overcome these barriers should be evaluated and successful models of educational leadership, pedagogy, and programming should be shared across the state.

3. Increase the cultural competency and awareness among educational professionals of Asian Pacific students. Understanding the strengths, interests, and needs of students is crucial in moving away from a deficit view of diverse student populations and in implementing strategies to increase the academic growth of students.

4. Policy makers and education leaders should solicit the input and involvement of refugee experienced and socioeconomically disadvantaged Asian Pacific communities in the vision of educational equity.

Community members should be regarded as powerful partners in education who have expertise in determining the viability and effectiveness of potential educational programming, strategies, and interventions for their students.

Read the entire report at http://www.capm.state.mn.us/pdf/edureport2012.pdf

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Posted by on April 16, 2012 in CAPM news, Resources

 

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Made in Minnesota 2011: Fertile Ground for Minority Opportunity

Minnesota 2020 recently released Made in Minnesota 2011: Fertile Ground for Minority Opportunity, which highlight findings on how immigrants, refugees and new arrivals to Minnesota are revitalizing neighborhoods
and entire communities through their involvement in MN’s agriculture economy and retail and other
business firms.

Some key findings:

  • Minnesota’s ethnic and immigrant communities contribute more than $12 billion to the state’s overall business activity.
  • Retail and service sales from minority-owned enterprises are estimated at $5.8 billion. These enterprises employed about 40,000 people.
  • Revenue at minority-owned firms increased by 83 percent between the 2002 and 2007 Census of business owners, compared to 30 percent for all Minnesota firms.
  • Minnesota farmers’ markets contribute up to $64 million in annual net economic benefits.
  • Minnesota is home to more than 11,300 Asian-owned businesses, generate $2.4 billion in revenue, and employ nearly 17,500 workers.
  • “Other Asian owned firms” (mostly Hmong) totaled 3,271 with $507 million in 2007 revenue.

Highlights on challenges and problems:

  • Mainstream and organic sectors of agriculture are capital-intensive and asset heavy, presenting a major barrier for entrance to agriculture.
  • New residents and prospective entrepreneurs have difficulty learning about and accessing federal and state programs that could help with everything from startup and business loans to complying with regulations.
    • Language problems and a general distrust of government are some of the main barriers.

Key recommendations:

The Minnesota Legislature should invest in expanding the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) and its Small Business Development Centers. Greater cultural awareness and expertise would help with outreach and training for aspiring ethnic entrepreneurs.

Minnesota’s Office of Tourism should develop a brochure guiding travelers who want to explore the state’s international cultural venues and markets, similar to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s Minnesota Grown directory.

 
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Posted by on December 8, 2011 in Community news, General Comments

 

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A Community of Contrasts: Asian Americans in the United States 2011

asian american national data census

A Community of Contrasts: Asian Americans in the United States 2011 compiles the latest data on Asian Americans at the national level. Produced by the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice, the report is a valuable resource to community organizations, elected and appointed officials, government agencies, foundations, corporations, and others looking to better understand and serve one of this country’s fastest growing and most diverse racial groups. Below is a summary of key findings in the report.

Note:  the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice will release a separate national report in 2012 dedicated to Pacific Islanders.

Asian Americans are the country’s fastest growing racial group.
The Asian American population in the United States grew 46% between 2000 and 2010, faster than any other racial group nationwide.

Asian Americans make significant contributions to the economy through entrepreneurial activity, job creation, and consumer spending.
Asian American entrepreneurs own over 1.5 million businesses, employing about 3 million people with an annual payroll of nearly $80 billion. Asian American firms were more likely than other firms to create jobs, and between 2000 and 2009, the buying power of Asian American communities increased 89%, from $269 billion to $509 billion.

Asian Americans are becoming citizens, registering to vote, and casting ballots
Approximately 68% of Asian Americans old enough to vote are U.S. citizens, but of those eligible to register to vote, 55% have done so, and the rate of Asian American voter turnout still lags behind that of non-Hispanic Whites. Greater naturalization, voter registration, and Get Out the Vote (GOTV) efforts are needed if Asian Americans are to realize their untapped political potential.

Immigration policies disproportionately impact Asian Americans.
Proportionately, Asian Americans are more likely than any other racial group to be foreign-born. Approximately 60% of Asian Americans were born outside the United States.

Language barriers continue to limit opportunities for millions of Asian Americans.
Roughly one out of every three Asian Americans are limited-English proficient (LEP). Providing assistance in Asian languages and greater opportunities to learn English promotes better access to good jobs, citizenship, voting, healthcare, social services, and the judicial system for millions of Asian Americans.

Asian American educational attainment varies widely among ethnic groups.

Disaggregated data show that the low educational attainment of Cambodians, Laotian, Hmong, and Vietnamese Americans limit employment opportunities for many in Southeast Asian communities. Job training programs and vocational English language instruction should be targeted to Asian Americans with lower levels of educational attainment in an effort to increase access to good jobs.

Some Asian Americans struggle economically.
Hmong Americans have the lowest per capita income of any racial or ethnic group nationwide, while Hmong, Bangladeshi, and Cambodian Americans have poverty rates that approach those of African Americans and Latinos. Federal, state, and local governments should establish or expand culturally and linguistically accessible public assistance programs to meet these needs.

Unemployment has impacted Southeast Asian American communities.
Hmong, Laotian, and Cambodian Americans have unemployment rates higher than the national average. Job training, adult English language learning, unemployment benefits, and other safety net programs should be made accessible to these workers as they struggle to get back on their feet.

Asian Americans continue to face housing concerns.
59% of Asian Americans own homes nationwide, yet homeownership rates lags significantly behind that of non-Hispanic Whites, with a majority of Bangladeshi, Hmong, and Korean Americans renting rather than owning their own homes.  The problem is compounded by large numbers of Asian Americans living in overcrowded housing.

Access to affordable healthcare coverage is critical for Asian Americans.
Asian Americans are twice as likely than both non-Hispanic Whites and African Americans to have seen a doctor in the past five years, despite being more likely to develop hepatitis, stomach and liver cancer, and other diseases. Asian Americans are also more likely than non-Hispanic Whites to be uninsured. The federal government should work with insurance companies and employers to expand access to affordable healthcare coverage for all U.S. residents, including immigrants.

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To view the full report, visit: http://www.advancingjustice.org/pdf/Community_of_Contrast.pdf

To visit the Center for Advancing Justice website, visit: http://www.advancingjustice.org/

 
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Posted by on November 10, 2011 in National news

 

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Asian Americans most bullied in US schools: study

Includes excerpts from article reported by By Shaun Tandon (AFP) – Oct 28, 2011

bully free zone

photo by Eddie~S

Asian Americans endure far more bullying at US schools than members of other ethnic groups, with teenagers of the community three times as likely to face taunts on the Internet, new data shows. 54 percent of Asian American teenagers said they were bullied in the classroom

The figure was 38.4 percent for African Americans and 34.3 percent for Hispanics, a government researcher involved in the data analysis told AFP.

The disparity was even more striking for cyber-bullying. Some 62 percent of Asian Americans reported online harassment once or twice a month, compared with 18.1 percent of whites. The researcher said more study was needed on why the problem is so severe among Asian Americans.

The data comes from a 2009 survey supported by the US Justice Department and Education Department which interviewed some 6,500 students from ages 12 to 18. Asian Americans are generally defined as tracing ancestry to East Asia, the Indian subcontinent or the South Pacific.

For more information, read the White House Initiative on AAPI blog post and NCES data findings.

 
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Posted by on November 8, 2011 in Community news, National news

 

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Minneapolis Foundation releases OneMinneapolis report, Oct. 2011

onempls

About the OneMinneapolis report released in October 2011:

The Minneapolis Foundation partnered with Wilder Research in 2010 to select community-level indicators that reflect the community’s educational, economic, and social environment. OneMinneapolis was created to help our community better understand, track, and improve how all of our neighbors are faring across 24 community indicators.

The OneMinneapolis report identified racial disparities in education, jobs, housing, justice, and other critical areas. The most severe of racial disparities were identified in the following community indicators:

  • Kindergartners ready for school
  • 3rd graders proficient in reading
  • Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) students graduating on time
  • MPS graduates who enroll directly in post-secondary education
  • MPS students who show strong attendance
  • Minneapolis children living in poverty
  • Minneapolis families living in poverty

Highlights of the data for Asian Pacific communities:

minneapolis population table

Original image from OneMinneapolis report, Minneapolis Foundation (2011)

Economics and poverty

  • Among all low-income households in Minneapolis (earning less than $35,000 annually), Asian households are most likely to have affordable housing.
  • Among working aged adults, the employment rate for Asians is 60% and 78% for Whites.
  • 58% of jobs in Minneapolis pay a “family supporting wage” of $40,000 a year (2009).

 Children & Youth  

  • Asian students in Minneapolis Public Schools are the least likely to report having a caring community adult in their lives.
    • 64% for Asian students compared to 73% for all students.
  • Today, more than half of all the American Indian, Asian, and Black children living in Minneapolis are in poverty.
    • 67% of Asian children in Minneapolis are living in poverty.
    • Among Asian children, those with one or more foreign-born parents (75%) are far more likely to be in poverty than those whose parents were both born in the U.S. (44%).

Education

  • Asian students in Minneapolis Public Schools are the most likely to exhibit strong attendance and the least likely to be suspended.
  • Among Asian students enrolled in 3rdgrade in Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS), 47% are proficient in reading.
    • However, Asian students who were English Language Learners were only 26% proficient in reading.
    • The overall 3rd grader proficiency rate for reading in MPS is 54% (2009-2010 school year).
  • Asian students in MPS have a graduate rate of 58% compared to 71% for White students.
  • 67% of Minneapolis Public Schools’ Asian graduates went on to enroll in college in 2010 fall compared to 73% for Whites.
To view the full OneMinneapolis report, dashboard, and project overview, visit http://www.minneapolisfoundation.org/OneMinneapolis/Home.aspx
 
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Posted by on November 7, 2011 in Community news

 

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